How To Surprisingly Turn D&D 5e Into An Old School OSR Game

D&D as old school OSR game

This is a bit of an on-going experiment, but I decided to strip Dungeons and Dragons 5th edition down to its core to see how close I could replicate the earlier editions of the game. 

Or, in other words, make it more like an old school D&D or OSR (Old School Renaissance) game. 

And surprisingly, it works pretty well. 

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Spellcasters Have A Concentration Problem

Spellcasters Have A Concentration Problem

One of the big issues I have with spellcasting in D&D 5th edition is the restriction on casting spells that require concentration.

The rule as written in the Player’s Handbook is as follows:

Some spells require you to maintain concentration in order to keep their magic active. If you lose concentration, such a spell ends.

If a spell must be maintained with concentration, that fact appears in its Duration entry, and the spell specifics how long you can concentrate on it. You can end concentration at any time (no action required).

Normal activity, such as moving and attacking, doesn’t interfere with concentration. The following factors can break concentration:

Casting another spell that requires concentration. You lose concentration on a spell if you cast another spell that requires concentration. You can’t concentrate on two spells at once.

I understand the reason the designers did this – to limit the number of spells a caster could have “up” at any one time, but I feel like the pendulum swung too far.

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Examples Of The Common Sense Test In Action

Examples Of The Common Sense Test In Action

I have been getting some feedback on my last article around making adjudications and using what I like to call the Common Sense test when making them.

Basically, the common sense test boils down to you asking yourself ‘does this make sense?’

And if it does, all good. But if it doesn’t then you are within your rights to change it. Or even disallow it.

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Gnomes – A New Take

Seeker Gnome

I hate gnomes.

Not the race themselves.

But the way D&D have dealt with them.

In 5th edition there are two versions: forest gnomes and rock gnomes (which are basically tinker gnomes).

I dislike both of these subtypes.

But, it’s not just the subtypes I dislike – there is a larger issue here.

D&D has never really decided where gnomes fit in.

And this issue has been prevalent throughout all editions of D&D, so I am not picking on 5th edition here.

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Being Creative Vs Rules – A Small Rant

Rules Vs Creativity

I am was a member of a lot of D&D groups and forums and one type of post comes up again and again.

It’s what I call the “Can I have…” post.

I see so many GMs posting on these forums “Can I have a vampire as a Patron for a Warlock?” Or “Is it possible for a Hill Giant to be a Wizard?”

I am not sure what these posters are actually looking for – whether it’s validation of their idea or permission to include these in their games.

Whatever the reason it strikes me as a contest of creativity vs. rules.

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How Would Nations And Governments View Wizard Schools

How nations view wizard schools

In this post I want to explore the Wizard class and how the various spell schools could impact your campaign world.

The Wizard class in 5th edition pushes the magic-user into specialising in a particular school at second level.

With this in mind I got to thinking about how each wizard and school would be perceived in the wider campaign world.

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